New-Year's-Eve-Family-Party-Traditions-Kids

Ushering in the New Year as a family can be a blast with just a little effort on your part. Here are seven ways to entertain the kids and make your family New Years Eve party memorable for all.

1. Make bags for the kids to open each hour up until midnight

I usually start letting the kids open goodie bags beginning at 8:00. These bags give them something to look forward to as they count down each hour until midnight. Each bag contains a variety of poppers, sparklers, noisemakers or candy in them.

2. Freeze Dance Parties

After the kids open their bags, we start our hourly freeze dance party until we’re down to one winner. It keeps everyone laughing and looking forward to the next hourly celebration!

3. Turn your Christmas Tree into a New Years one

We always leave our tree up until after the new year, so turning it into a New Year tree is a lot of fun! I love this idea of adding balloons, filled with money and fortunes, to pop at midnight. You probably need to have a faux tree like ours to do that though.

4. Fun, interactive games are a must

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Especially if they involve a little money. We always play Left, Center, Right using pennies or quarters to make it a little more fun for everyone. Other games we love to play are Telestrations, Speak Out and Wits and Wagers get the creativity and laughs flowing!

5. Serve Festive Drinks

How about a fun Torani Soda Bar setup? Or sparkling cider in plastic stemware is always a fun option for the kids.

6. Make Vision Hats or choose your One Word for 2020

A friend gave me the idea of turning our New Years Hats into walking vision boards. Such a fun idea! Have everyone cut out pictures and words from magazines representing what they hope for in 2018 and glue them to their party hat! Or start thinking about your One Word for 2020.

7. 20 YEAR END REVIEW QUESTIONS

Cut these up and put them in a New Years Hat. Pass them around and have each person answer the question they draw. Print the entire list and have everyone answer all 20 questions!

1. What new friends did you make this year?

2. What friendships did you let go of?

3. How did you express creativity this year?

4. How did you serve others?

5. How did you live out your faith?

6. What was the most fun thing you did this year?

7. Who did you miss seeing this year?

8. Who did you love visiting with this year?

9. What moment from 2019 brings a smile to your face?

10. What’s something sad that happened in 2019?

11. How were you courageous this year?

12. How did you relax this year?

13. What was the best place you visited this year?

14. What new restaurant did you enjoy this year?

15. What’s something new you tried in 2019?

16. What movie did you love watching this year?

17. What was your favorite book that you read?

18. What was a favorite gift you received this year?

19. Who helped you be a better person this year?

20. What’s something that surprised you in 2019?

Happy New Year Friends! See you in 2020!

Youthful eyes are on us this holiday season.

They watch how we celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.

They pay attention to what we spend our money and time on.

They feel our stress or our peace during the month of December.

What our children learn to value at Christmastime, they learn from us as parents.

The holidays are the perfect time to teach our kids life lessons through how we choose to celebrate, give and receive.

Are you gifting your children lifelong lessons this holiday season?

5-Gifts-To-Give-Your-Child-At-Christmas

Here are 5 gifts you need to give your child this Christmas season

1. The Gift of Appreciation

Model for your child how to show appreciation to others throughout the holiday season.

What should you do when invited over to a home for a party or dinner? Let your kids see you contribute to the holiday meal by bringing a dish or a small gift for the host. Teach them not to show up at someone’s home empty-handed.

By all means, teach your child the importance of handwriting thank you notes for gifts they receive or kindness they’ve been shown. Teachers also cherish receiving written words of appreciation from their students.

5 reasons writing thank you notes should not be optional for your kids

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2. The Gift of Giving

Teach your child the importance of giving to others instead of focusing on just receiving.

Let siblings pick out gifts for each other and buy them with their own money. Growing up, my Mom had a ‘Mom store’ where my sister and I could buy things from a closet shelf where she had gathered inexpensive items for us to choose from. I carried on the same tradition until my kids were old enough to go out shopping on their own.

Let children be involved in the gift-giving by using their own money and ideas. This way they begin to learn the value of selecting personal gifts that fit each person. Who doesn’t love a thoughtful gift giver?

3. The Gift of Compassion

Talk to your kids about how you are helping people with your time and money this season. Unfortunately, there are many people who are hurting during the holidays. What can your family do to show that you care?

We kept a Christmas Jar out all year long to collect change we found. I have a family in mind to gift it to but want to see if we are all in agreeance or is there someone else we should bless instead?

Carry dollars for kids to drop in Salvation Army buckets. Pull angels off of mall trees and buy gifts for kids in foster care. The ways you can help others through your giving is endless. Let your kids watch you continuously give to those who need your help if and when you’re able.

4. The Gift of Contribution

Christmas cheer shouldn’t just be made possible by mom, it should be a collective family effort contributing to traditions together.

Have your kids help bake the cookies. They can stamp and seal the envelopes of the Christmas cards. Pull out the ornaments and adorn the tree together.  Help pick out gifts for loved ones and wrap them as a family.

Get children of all ages involved in contributing to the magic of Christmas rather than just consuming.

5. The Gift of Humility

Teach your son or daughter that gifts aren’t for posting on social media. Google the Christmas Haul if you don’t know what I’m talking about. Kids sit around on Christmas morning showing off everything they unwrapped on Instagram and YouTube for everyone to see.

We must talk to our kids about the inappropriateness and unnecessary posting of material items received at Christmas. Better yet, how about us not gifting them anything worthy of bragging about in the first place. We don’t want our children finding their worth in owning the top of the line iPhone or expensive athletic shoes.

If we teach our children to appreciate, contribute and give to others this Christmas season then our gifts will live on way beyond December 25th.

Merry Christmas to your family! May you enjoy this precious season with your loved ones celebrating the birth of our Savior Jesus Christ!