Sami-Cone-Show-Meaningful-Mothers-Day-Mementoes

When I was diagnosed with cervical cancer several years ago, I questioned what I would want to
hand down to my four young children if that disease were to take my life.

Fortunately, I returned to full health and with a deeper appreciation for the importance of leaving a legacy while I’m alive and able. I developed my legacy keepsake product line because of that experience.

Moms must take the time to capture the memories and moments of motherhood through the
years. I created three products to help mothers create a lasting keepsake to enjoy today and pass down to future generations.

READ How To Create A Meaningful Keepsake for Your Child

 

How to Create Meaningful Mementos to Hand Down to our Kids

Let’s take a deeper look at these three meaningful mementos that we can hand down to our kids.

1. 100 Questions for Mom Journal

The 100 Questions for Mom journal helps moms of all ages and stages intentionally record the many moments of their lives and legacies. After all, our wisdom can only be treasured by future generations if we take the time to share our stories.

100-Questions-For-Mom-Journal-Amy-Carney

This guided journal, created for mothers and grandmothers, is full of thoughtful prompts that
encourage you to record your stories. Insightful questions are on every page, from childhood
memories to reflections on your hopes for the future.

READ MORE ON SAMICONE.COM

earth day farmers market

Let’s use Earth Day as an excuse to pause and consider how well we are stewarding God’s beautiful creation- our planet Earth.

Here are some ideas to help your family have some fun on Earth Day, while also educating yourself on ways to better Reduce, Reuse, Refuse and Recycle this spring and beyond!

Here Are Great Ways to Celebrate & Feel Good About Helping Our Planet 🌎

1. Create a new earth-friendly habit for your family in 2021

What is one thing you could do to lessen your footprint on the planet right now?

  • Buy washable, reusable grocery bags to use instead of plastic. (My favorites are Envirosax.)
earth day farmers market

We loved our weekly outings to Uptown Farmers Market in Phoenix during quarantine!

  • Can you cut down on purchasing one-time-use disposables and single-use plastics such as bottled water? We stopped buying bottled water over a year ago and fill up reusable pitchers and individual stainless steel bottles instead.
  • My favorite habit we started during Covid quarantine was to begin composting thanks to Recycled City. Why not throw your food waste into a compost bin instead of the trash can contributing to your local food economy by creating fresh, chemical-free soil.

2. Get outside and enjoy an Earth Dayte

  • Visit a National Park since it’s also National Park Week this week! Get the details HERE
  • Go support a local farmers market or farm-to-table restaurant. Find your local farmer’s market or local food directory HERE
  • Take the kids on an Earth Day Scavenger Hunt or Color Walk around the neighborhood

color-nature-walk

3. Stay inside and enjoy learning virtually

  • Play an online game to test your recycling knowledge HERE
  • Take a virtual tour of a Recycling Facility

Educate yourself on environmental issues by watching thought-provoking documentaries (These were recommended to me, but I have not personally watched them all yet. Reply to this email if you have any favorites to add!)

  • The Story of Plastic Takes a sweeping look at the man-made crisis of plastic pollution and the worldwide effect it has on the health of our planet and the people who inhabit it.
  • More Than Honey – Tackles the vexing issue of why bees, worldwide, are facing extinction.
  • Dirt – Learn how to compost, why it’s important for the fate of our world, and other awesome facts about this often underestimated part of life.
  • The True Cost – The True Cost is an unprecedented project that invites us on an eye-opening journey around the world and into the lives of the many people and places behind our clothes.
  • How about watching the Netflix series Win the Wilderness  – where six British couples brave sub-zero temperatures, wild bears, and predators as they compete to win a home deep within the Alaskan wilderness.

4. Keep used textiles out of landfills and donate them instead

It’s not helpful to drop off stained, ripped, or worn-out clothing at any thrift store. Instead of throwing your unusable textiles in the garbage,  you can drop them in for-profit parking lot bins and they will turn your “trash” into treasure.

donate-textiles-parking-lot-bins

You can also recycle your plastic grocery bags at accepting locations near you HERE  Learn what plastics are recyclable HERE You might be surprised what you are throwing away that you could recycle instead!

Also, look for places to donate your old batteries, corks, printer ink cartridges, or electronics.

5. Make eco-friendly household cleaners

White vinegar and vodka are power cleaners, easily cutting through grease and removing mildew, odors, stains, and wax buildup. Reuse existing spray bottles in your home instead of buying new ones! HERE are some eco-friendly cleaning ‘recipes’ from my friend Sami.

What other ways do you enjoy celebrating and stewarding this amazing planet that we live on?

 

Allowance-financial-literacy-game

When I was growing up, the subject of money was taboo. It’s no wonder I struggled with overspending and compiling significant debt as a young adult. I worked two jobs, yet I didn’t have the skills to properly manage my money because I’d never learned how to do so. 

Therefore, I knew through my financial struggles that I wanted to do my best to raise my children with stronger financial skills. What they then did with that knowledge would be up to them as adults.

How can we raise money smart kids today?

We can teach them from a young age (or as teenagers) how to earn, spend, save and give their money away.

Money-Quote

5 Ways to Raise MONEY SMART KIDS

1. Model conscious spending habits

Let your children see you consciously save, spend and give away your money as they grow up in your home. Let them see your spending decisions match your values. Talk about how you choose to save money in one area so that you can spend in another.

Maybe you purposely buy a lesser expensive car or house than what you can afford so that you instead have money to take a memory-making family vacation or have money to give away to people in need.

Perhaps you teach your kids how to stretch their dollar by modeling the value of shopping at thrift stores, resale retailers, and consignment shops. Shopping second-hand is good for the environment as well as for our wallets.

Explain to your kids that the less you spend on material items, the more you have to spend on experiences that matter. Be conscious of what you choose to spend your money on because your children are paying attention.

2. Consider ways for your child to earn money

There are so many ways to help even young children begin to earn their own cash today.

Teach your children the value of recycling and that by helping our environment, you can also build up your bank accounts. When our kids were young, we lived in California, where recycling plastic water bottles and aluminum cans can earn you cash in hand.

Now we take our already read books to Half Price Books and our outgrown clothes to consignment shops for the kids to earn cash. Our older kids sell items on online sites like Offer up, eBay, or Poshmark.

How could your son or daughter begin to earn their own money before they’re old enough to get a job in the community?

3. Give your kids a consistent allowance to manage

Giving an allowance is a way that we can begin to teach our kids how to save, spend and donate their money.

An allowance isn’t earned in our home but instead given as an opportunity for our kids to learn how to budget. Our kids are learning how to manage their money, and the goal is for them to see that there’s not an unlimited supply of cash. They are learning to make choices when it comes to their spending and saving.

READ 4 TIPS FOR GIVING KIDS AN ALLOWANCE 

One weekend our daughter used her allowance money to go to the water park with her friends. When she came home, she said she couldn’t believe how expensive it was. She would never know those waterpark outings were expensive if we continued to pay for them.

Allow your child to feel the pain of their spending choices now while the stakes are low.

4. Have your child open and manage their bank account

It’s a good idea to have your children each open a bank account early in life. After beginning with a savings account, they can eventually begin a checking account, possibly with a debit card attached, so they can start to learn how to use banking tools successfully before leaving home.

Teach your children how to deposit and withdrawal money in the bank and online. I prefer my kids still go into the bank branch and work face to face with the tellers, even though most of the transactions could be done online.

5. Invest in tools to help you teach financial lessons

Engage your children in learning about important financial concepts in your mission to raise Money Smart Kids. One online resource to help you do that is Dave Ramsey’s self-study finance courses, which happen to be on sale right now for $19.99.

We purchased one of these personal finance courses for my senior sons during the pandemic, and we sat as a family on the living room couch doing it together, even though they acted like we were torturing them, making them do it.  

I do not work with Mr. Ramsey or make one cent off of his products, but I think it’s an excellent resource for those of you wanting to teach your children more about personal finance!

The Allowance Game was a family favorite when our kids were growing up! If you’ve got elementary school-aged kids, grab this board game at Lakeshore Learning HERE.

How are you striving to raise Money Smart Kids in your home?

Allowance-financial-literacy-game

The Allowance Game was a family favorite when our kids were growing up! If you’ve got elementary school aged kids, grab this board game at Lakeshore Learning HERE

How are you striving to raise Money Smart Kids in your home?