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4 Ways to Create Meaningful Traditions in a Glass Jar

We read posts about various traditions created within a glass jar. We love the ideas, we’re motivated while reading about them, yet we never get around to actually accomplishing one ourselves.

The post about the Christmas jar tradition will start making it’s rounds around Facebook in December and we’ll be reminded that we had wanted to do that but didn’t. We need to see that post now and not when we’re supposed to actually be delivering the thing.

Let’s turn our intentions into action and start that meaningful glass jar tradition now.

Grab a glass jar, pick one of these 4 traditions and get started today.

1. Joy Jar

Create a time capsule showcasing all that brings you joy this year. Add mementos, ticket stubs and anything that signifies a joyful moment. You won’t bury this time capsule, but instead, empty it out on New Year’s Eve and reminisce about all of the memories you made.

An annual joy jar is an intentional way to collect items you can eventually use for that scrapbook you intend to put together one day. This post has some great ideas for furthering this idea!

2. Countdown clock

You will need two of the same jar for this. 

Fill one jar with 936 pennies to represent all of the weeks you have with your child from when they’re born until they turn 18. It’s a powerful visual to physically see each week represented by a penny.

childhood-countdown-clock-936-pennies

It really pulls at the heartstrings when you begin removing the pennies that you’ve already spent in your child’s life. Yikes! These jars of pennies are a great visual to help us consciously think about how we are investing our time with our child. When we see what little time we have left until they turn 18, we are more mindful how we spend our days.

childhood-countdown-clocks-936-pennies
3. Christmas Jar

See a penny pick it up, all the day you’ll have good luck.

Or perhaps it will bring blessing to another through your Christmas jar.

Collect all your found money throughout the year, throw in extra change you have on hand and give your jar away this Christmas to a family in need.

My husband came home from the gym and dropped this crumpled up one dollar bill into our jar. He said no one was around to claim it, so he picked it up to add to our jar. If we weren’t doing this, I doubt he would’ve even cared to grab that money. I most certainly would’ve never heard about it even if he had.

A Christmas jar is an intentional way for your family to have a small purpose together throughout the year. You are creating a really meaningful moment come December when you see how much you’ve collected and decide together who you want to bless with it.

4. Happiness Jar

I love the Happiness Jar and want to do it, but I also get overwhelmed at the thought of writing something down daily. I think it’s a fabulous idea and for some of you may be the perfect tradition to focus on!

On New Year’s Eve, open up your Jar of Happy and read all of the precious moments and reflect on the beauty of your year. I think I’m going to include some of these paper strips of happiness in my Joy Jar instead.

Are there any other glass jar traditions that your family does or wants to do?

 

6 replies
  1. Michelle Vallee
    Michelle Vallee says:

    One of my best friends shared with me the idea of a worry jar… when you are worried or stressed about something, write it down, put it in the jar, and “give it to God.” Pray about it and have faith that God will help… you don’t need to hold onto to all that worry/stress yourself, God is there. It is so freeing. 🙏🏻

    Reply
  2. Lori
    Lori says:

    We made a Family Dinner Questions jar. It is filled with strips of paper with questions on it. We each take a turn during meal time. Many times we would still be answering questions well after we were done eating when the kids were younger. Some questions were, what’s your favorite holiday? Favorite season? What has your mom/dad shown you about love? If you had a super power, what would you want it to be and why?…

    Reply

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